New $10 note in circulation

KEEPING WATCH: Vision Australia Warrnambool volunteer and client Rose Egerton is happy a new $10 note is going into circulation but has urged banks to keep considering the vision impaired when developing new technologies.
KEEPING WATCH: Vision Australia Warrnambool volunteer and client Rose Egerton is happy a new $10 note is going into circulation but has urged banks to keep considering the vision impaired when developing new technologies.

WARRNAMBOOL’S vision impaired community is eagerly anticipating the arrival of the new $10 note.

The new tactile $10 note goes into circulation today and has won a tick of approval from Vision Australia Warrnambool volunteer Rose Egerton.

“The $5 note has been great and from what I’ve read about the $10 note, it sounds really good,”  Ms Egerton said.

“It certainly does help when you are handling money.”

Ms Egerton, who has vision in one eye but is legally blind, said she hoped the government and banking institutions continued their strong track record of being inclusive for the vision impaired.

She said the next great challenge will come as the move goes further towards a cashless society.

“The banks have been good so far with the buttons on ATMs and earphone access as well,” Ms Egerton said.

“But I have read the ATMs will go to touch screens in the future which will make it difficult for people with poor or no vision. Hopefully Vision Australia will continue to be included in any consultation going forward.”

Vision Australia general manager of advocacy and engagement Karen Knight backed the inclusion calls made by Ms Egerton.

“From speaking to our blind and low vision clients we know the introduction of the tactile $5 note has had a positive impact in their lives and we’re excited to see a second tactile note entering circulation,” Ms Knight said.

“They say the tactile features have significantly helped them to identify banknotes and to feel more confident to pay with and receive cash.

“While cash still plays a major role in day-to-day transactions, electronic payment methods are increasingly becoming the norm. It’s vital that any further advances in technology in this area have accessibility at the forefront.”

Ms Knight said the banking sector needed to be in discussion with the disability and accessibility sectors.

“People who are blind or have low vision deserve the same opportunities to complete their financial transactions safely and securely,” Ms Knights said.