Port Fairy Winter Weekend's Loren Tuck says changes in the port town are always keeping it fresh

Happy at home: Port Fairy Winter Weekends joint co-ordinator Loren Tuck lists New York, Tokyo and Tasmania in her dream destinations but for now she's more than happy to call Port Fairy home.

Happy at home: Port Fairy Winter Weekends joint co-ordinator Loren Tuck lists New York, Tokyo and Tasmania in her dream destinations but for now she's more than happy to call Port Fairy home.

Loren Tuck lives in Port Fairy in a mid-century modern shack she's renovating with her husband Sam and baby girl Zena. Originally from Sydney, Loren's been in Victoria for over a decade, working in communications, teaching and disaster recovery. After a couple of years sweltering in the tropical humidity of Cambodia, she now calls the port town home.

What do you most love about living in Port Fairy? The water, the weather, the markets, the people, the community and the subtle changes throughout the year that keep things so fresh. And I love the light here.

How do you immerse yourself in the community?  I'm a volunteer with Winter Weekends – a crew of big-hearted, clever people. Our meetings are usually pretty funny and probably go for way too long each week. 

What is something people might not know about you? I lived in Italy for a while and helped restore a 400-year-old farmhouse in Tuscany, including grafting hundreds of chestnut trees in the hills around the house. It was one of the best jobs I've ever had. 

If you could choose to go back 100 years or forward 100 years what would you do and why? Back, to be around for the evolution of eras of funk, soul, disco and electronic music. 

What recipe are you renowned for cooking for family or friends? Something simple like lemon or banana cakes. Or maybe one of those salads where I chuck a million ingredients together, always with apple and nuts, and then splash it with olive oil and lemon juice.

If you had all the time in the world to pursue and perfect any hobby what would it be? There are so many things I am keen to try but painting ceramic plates is next on the list. Or maybe tapestry. And it's not really a hobby, but I'm really keen to know more about Aboriginal history in Australia. Like most people, my schooling on our nation's first peoples was pretty limited and colonial-focused and I increasingly see that there's a lot to learn about and gain from such a rich, ancient culture. 

What is the best piece of advice you've been given? I worked and lived in Greece for a summer and my boss there fancied himself a bit of a philosopher. He told me that everything must be in the right measure in order to achieve balance. He wasn't the most balanced person I've ever met, and I have a tendency to opt for extremes, but I do like the sound of it.

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