Warrnambool Sixes warm to international comp

Making up the Warrnambool Sixes bound for the Penang International Sixes cricket tournament are (back from left) Richard McKellar, Jayaweera Bandara, Jason Mungean, Jeremy Cook, Jarrod Wilson, front, Dominic Bandara, 13, Shanaka Perumpuli and Tyler Mungean, 17.

Making up the Warrnambool Sixes bound for the Penang International Sixes cricket tournament are (back from left) Richard McKellar, Jayaweera Bandara, Jason Mungean, Jeremy Cook, Jarrod Wilson, front, Dominic Bandara, 13, Shanaka Perumpuli and Tyler Mungean, 17.

HOT and humid weather will greet a Warrnambool and District Cricket Association squad when it arrives in Malaysia tonight. 

The cricketers are among Australian representatives at the 20th Penang International Sixes, a three-day tournament which brings the island state to life each year.

The tournament starts on Friday and pits six-member sides from seven countries against each other, with the emphasis on fun and experiencing new cultures.

The Warrnambool Sixes side features two father-son combinations — Russells Creek’s Jayaweera and Dominic Bandara and Nirranda’s Jason and Tyler Mungean.

Jeremy Cook, Shanaka Perumpuli (both Russells Creek), Richard McKellar (Merrivale) and Jarrod Wilson (East Warrnambool) are also bound for Penang.

Jayaweera said the tournament would be “a good experience for the guys”.

“You meet people from different countries. They’ve got seven countries they tell me playing in this tournament,” he said.

“You get to know a few good players. It’s more the experience for the guys in a different country in different conditions.”

The Warrnambool Sixes play three pool matches on Friday and Saturday before potentially a quarter-final, semi-final and final on Sunday.

Their rivals include Sri Lankan side St Peter’s Old Boys, who feature former Test opener Malinda Warnapura, and the Royal Malaysian Air Force.

All matches are five overs per side, with innings lasting just 20 minutes. Other rules include no LBW and batsmen must retire once they make 30 runs.

“You still play the normal way (in five-over cricket), try and get bat on ball every ball,” Bandara said.

“We’ve been training for the last couple of months to get used to that type of cricket.

“It’s similar to Twenty20. You don’t have to change your style. It’s just bat on ball, try and get a run every ball if you can.”

afawkes@fairfaxmedia.com.au

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