Generous students full of charity - and spaghetti

MAKING a huge mess is fun for any high school student but doing it in the name of charity is even better.

Liam Collins, 15 (right) and Corey Johnstone, 16, put the cutlery — and manners — to one side during yesterday’s spaghetti-eating contest at Warrnambool College. 140822AS01 Picture: AARON SAWALL

Liam Collins, 15 (right) and Corey Johnstone, 16, put the cutlery — and manners — to one side during yesterday’s spaghetti-eating contest at Warrnambool College. 140822AS01 Picture: AARON SAWALL

Daffodil Day was the inspiration for Warrnambool College’s latest house-driven philanthropic event yesterday, as students from years seven to 12 raised money for the Cancer Council with a spaghetti-eating contest.

Assistant principal Emma Miller said students also sold out of Daffodil Day merchandise and were invited to come to school dressed in the cancer colour showing how they had been impacted by the disease.

“We embrace anything student-driven where students can feel actively and intrinsically involved in steering the direction of their fund-raising,” Ms Miller said. “Every house at the college has a philanthropic trust connected with them.

“The Childers house’s fund-raising for Daffodil Day has been immense and the leaders are very proactive under teacher Lisa Douglas’ tutelage.”

As well as the spaghetti eating, she said a Hope Wall had been set up with more than 600 students leaving different coloured messages representing how they had been touched by cancer.

“They really embraced it. It was lovely to see the colour combination from the student body and to have that awareness of cancer.

“Unfortunately there are very few today who haven’t had a connection with cancer, whether through a family member or friend, so it’s quite a relevant charity for the kids.”

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