City of Warrnambool Eisteddfod dance competition

Tayla Bell dancing in the 8 years and under category. Picture: Morgan Hancock
Tayla Bell dancing in the 8 years and under category. Picture: Morgan Hancock

THE popularity of dance continues to soar with big numbers taking part in the City of Warrnambool Eisteddfod dance competition. 

LIGHT ON HER FEET: Bethany Dyson from St Helens dancing in the 8 years and under category at the City of Warrnambool Eisteddfod dance competition. Held at the Lighthouse Theatre, the competition finishes on Saturday. Picture: Morgan Hancock

LIGHT ON HER FEET: Bethany Dyson from St Helens dancing in the 8 years and under category at the City of Warrnambool Eisteddfod dance competition. Held at the Lighthouse Theatre, the competition finishes on Saturday. Picture: Morgan Hancock

Eisteddfod dance co-ordinator Elizabeth Field said 2018 was a crack field.

“We have 1070 dancers registered from the ages of 6-40,” Ms Field said.

“That is an increase on last year which is great to see.

“I think more children are keen to get out there and exercise and be active and dancing is a great way to do that.”

The dance competition started on Monday and is being held at the Lighthouse Theatre.

It will continue each day this week, concluding on Saturday night, with championships in categories including tap, ballet, theatrical and jazz dance.

“The eisteddfod always produces a really high standard of competition,” Ms Field said.

“It is a wonderful opportunity for the dancers to perform, it puts dancing in the spotlight.” 

The eisteddfod has the support of dance schools across the region including Melissa’s Dance Elements in Warrnambool.

Melissa’s Dance Elements principal Melissa Dance said the eisteddfod played an important role in the development of young dancers.

“It is a wonderful platform for our budding dancers, it gives them an opportunity to refine their skills,” Ms Dance said.

“It is a great confidence builder for them, they are up against dancers from places like Geelong, Ballarat, Ararat and Portland.

“Each time they dance they get great feedback from the adjudicators, which helps them improve and be the best dancers they can be.

“Dancers can be their own worst critics so it is good to get positive feedback from adjudicators who see the progress the dancers are making.”

The eisteddfod began in May with speech and drama with vocal and music through June. Debating will follow dance with calisthenics the final stage in August.