Clontarf Academy and Warrnambool Special Development School begin replanting trees along the edge of the Merri River

Young men were joining forces to save Warrnambool’s Merri River on Wednesday.

After the removal of trees that were choking the waterways, students from Warrnambool’s Clontarf Academy and Special Development School were planting indigenous species to save local habitat.

The clearance and revegetation is part of the Merri River restoration project that aims to plant 9900 plants along the Merri River between Caramut Road and the Wollaston Road bridge. 

Growing: The Warrnambool Clontarf Academy joined boys from the Warrnambool Special Development School in revegetating the fringe of the Merri River under the guidance of WCC's Matt King. Picture: Rebecca Riddle.

Growing: The Warrnambool Clontarf Academy joined boys from the Warrnambool Special Development School in revegetating the fringe of the Merri River under the guidance of WCC's Matt King. Picture: Rebecca Riddle.

The project aims to improve the river’s water quality, link patches of existing native vegetation and improve access to the river banks for recreational activities.

Wednesday’s activity was the brainchild of Warrnambool and District Landcare Network Facilitator Matt King.

“This is the second time the boys have been out here lending a hand,” he said. “It’s great they’re taking ownership of the project.

“The plan didn’t go as well as hoped because of the dry summer so we’re trying to top it up.”

The site is being revegetated with more than 1000 plants including native trees, shrubs and grasses. 

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