Jay Baillie jailed for seven days already served

​A ​DISGRUNTLED ex-partner who breached a court order just days after being released from prison has now been jailed for seven days.

​Jay Baillie, 38,​ appeared in the Warrnambool Magistrates Court ​this week and pleaded guilty guilty to breaching the order.

He was jailed for time that he has already served.

Magistrate Cynthia Toose said Baillie had not been able to get any benefit from a community corrections order because he offended again so quickly.

She warned him if he came back to court for similar offending he would go back to jail and the only reason he had avoided more time in prison was because his offending did not involve violence.

"If you breach the court order you will just get longer and longer sentences," she warned him.

​Baillie was arrested and charged after being out of custody for just three days.

​He previously pleaded guilty​ in the​ ​​magistrates ​c​ourt​ to a range of charges relating to incidents when he was separating from his long-time partner​, including smashing all the ​windows in her car, causing $4581.99 damage​.

He was jailed for seven months after indicating he would not comply with a community corrections order because he wanted to visit his seriously ill sister overseas.​

But, Baillie appealed against the severity of the jail term ​to the Warrnambool County Court ​and had his sentence reduced to a three-month jail term to be followed by a corrections order that Baillie said he was then willing to do.​

He was released from custody but then almost immediately reoffended.​

Defence counsel Alex McCulloch said his client suffered mental health issues, had been living out of his car, had no where to go and was upset and angry.

He said Baillie was now in a position to get accommodation and had organised work milking cows. 

Mr McCulloch said his client just wanted to say sorry for his past offending and see his children.

​The solicitor said Baillie did not get any benefit of supports from the CCO because he hadn't started on the corrections order​.

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