Restoration funds for Camperdown and Port Fairy heritage projects

Historic icon: The Camperdown clock tower will be improved through conservation work with $200,000 granted by the state government. Picture: Amy Paton
Historic icon: The Camperdown clock tower will be improved through conservation work with $200,000 granted by the state government. Picture: Amy Paton

Camperdown’s iconic clock tower and Port Fairy’s Battery Hill will be in good shape for the future after receiving $400,000 for restoration works.

The works on the clock tower as well as the cannons and carriages at Battery Hill will each be supported by $200,000 from the state government’s Living Heritage Program.

The Camperdown clock tower, constructed in 1896-97, will undergo work including brickwork rendering, a roof replacement and conservation of the clock faces.

Western Victoria MP Gayle Tierney said the clock tower was one of the community’s most cherished assets.

“Heritage sites are a big boost to tourism – and more visitors means more opportunities for hard-working Camperdown businesses,” she said.

Corangamite Shire mayor Jo Beard said the council was “extremely thrilled” money to support protection of the clock tower had been granted.

“The state government has acknowledged the significance of the Camperdown clock tower as an iconic asset of our region,” Cr Beard said.

Preserved for the future: One of the cannons at Port Fairy's Battery Hill.

Preserved for the future: One of the cannons at Port Fairy's Battery Hill.

At Battery Hill – which features four cannons and timber carriages dating back to the 1880s, built in anticipation of a Russian invasion – specialist conservation work will be undertaken on the cannons, carriages and two timber slides.

Port Fairy historian and National Trust branch president Marten Syme was “very pleased” to hear the rare site received funding.