Roads to Recovery Program drives road work

South-west councils will continue to roll out improvements to their local roads with help from more than $13 million through the Roads to Recovery Program this financial year.

Gravel re-sheeting, pavement replacement and bridge upgrades are among the projects being funded through the federal government program.

Corangamite Shire received about $3.2 million this financial year for three projects all expected to be completed by November.

Timber bridge decks will be replaced with concrete on the Daleys Road bridge at Ecklin South and Thorntons Road bridge at South Purrumbete, allowing the roads to cater for heavier vehicles. The shire will also undertake curb and channel replacement around Camperdown’s CBD between October and November.

Warrnambool City Council will complete three projects through $647,415 in funding. Existing surfaces will be removed and new pavement installed on Hayley Drive, from Julie Court to Paul Court; Scott Street from the McMeekin Road intersection to Strong Street; and Wellington Street, just west of the Merri Street intersection. Work is expected to begin in January and finish in March.

Glenelg Shire received $3,138,226 to complete 14 projects, including bridge strengthening, pavement rehabilitation and resealing. Work has already begun on those projects and all are expected to be complete by the end of the year. Moyne Shire received $3,641,341.

Southern Grampians received $2,842, 582, with 27 projects in the shire expected to be completed by the end of the year, mainly focusing on vegetation clearing, tree trimming, drainage an bitumen spray sealing work.

Member for Wannon Dan Tehan. Picture: Rob Gunstone

Member for Wannon Dan Tehan. Picture: Rob Gunstone

Member for Wannon Dan Tehan said the Roads to Recovery Program helped councils maintain and upgrade local roads.

“The Australian government is making a significant investment to improve roads because it’s what people want and because we recognise it will make our roads safer and more economically productive,” he said.