WAG welcomes Dangerous Deeds

The Warrnambool Art Gallery became a creative space for all abilities on Wednesday.

Members of the Start Community Art group engaged in workshops at the creative hub as part of the Dangerous Deeds exhibition touring Victoria.

Inclusion: The Warrnambool Art Gallery was the home of a creative energy entitled Dangerous Deeds on Wednesday when more than 100 all-ability art enthusiasts were lending their hands to a new community project expected in September. Picture: Morgan Hancock.

Inclusion: The Warrnambool Art Gallery was the home of a creative energy entitled Dangerous Deeds on Wednesday when more than 100 all-ability art enthusiasts were lending their hands to a new community project expected in September. Picture: Morgan Hancock.

The creative exercise is part of a Creative Victoria initiative promoting inclusion in the community.

Art enthusiasts of all abilities were designing and creating slides that will be projected on the exterior of Warrnambool’s Lighthouse Theatre in early September.

Melbourne projection artist Jim Coad, who joined workshops, said the upcoming exhibition was important for raising awareness and making a statement.

“It’s an opportunity for this all-abilities group to say ‘we’re here, don’t forget about us’ and ‘we’re making contributions to the community’.

Mr Coad said technology enabled the message to “appear on a large scale”.

“I’ve been asking the artists to think really big,” he said. “Most of them have done drawing before and even sculpture, but nothing as big as a building.”

Mr Coad said more than 125 designs created at the workshops would form slides to be projected onto the Lighthouse Theatre as part of the Rights, Lights, Sound event.

“The exhibition is all about having a voice in a creative space,” he said.

Disability activist and artist Larissa MacFarlane said the exhibition was a unique display of self-advocacy for people with disabilities.

“This is a disability-lead project,” she said. “It has started with people with a disability unlike most projects which are a project for people with a disability.”

Following a brain injury 18 years ago Ms MacFarlane said she felt “silent” and believed the style of the Dangerous Deeds exhibition gave rise to a new culture.

“As all-abilities artists we want to develop our sense of culture and let the rest of the world know we are highly skilled and have talents that are often ignored.”

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