Brooke Currie is excited about life at Allansford

NEW BEGINNING: Brooke Currie has joined the Allansford Cats after moving from Ballarat to Warrnambool to study at Deakin. Picture: Amy Paton

NEW BEGINNING: Brooke Currie has joined the Allansford Cats after moving from Ballarat to Warrnambool to study at Deakin. Picture: Amy Paton

NEW Allansford recruit Brooke Currie believes she will fit seamlessly into life at the Cattery.

The 18-year-old has signed on at Allansford after playing the vast majority of her junior netball at Central Highlands outfit Carngham-Linton.

Currie landed in the south-west on the back of securing study at Deakin University and moved to play with the Cats due to favourable reports from friends.

She was also encouraged to make the switch after falling in the love with the city on childhood holidays over the summer months.

“I’m studying commerce. We come down all the time over summer, and I absolutely loved it, so I just thought, why not study here?,” Currie told The Standard.

“Warrnambool isn’t a huge city, and that also appealed to me being from Ballarat.

“I’m staying on res at the moment. Allansford are fairly close to the campus so it works well. I knew a few people that played cricket for Allansford, and they absolutely loved it, so I thought I’d give netball out there a try.”

The versatile midcourt-goaler said the club was itching to lock-down a finals berth after narrowly missing out in 2016.

“It’s definitely a big goal for us. We had our first practice match last week and it went really well considering we’ve just come together,” Currie said.

“We hadn’t had a full game with anyone so it went really, really well.”

Allansford, who appointed Bridget Foster and returning player Sarah Neeson to its ranks as co-coaches for 2017, has been buoyed by an influx of new players.

The club’s outgoing coach, Kim Jamieson, will remain in a coaching capacity with the Cats’ A reserve outfit.

She is expected to provide support to Foster and Neeson in a less formal capacity than last season.

“One coach is an attacker, and one is a defender. As a player, you can bounce ideas off both and it works really, really well,” Currie said.

“I’ve come from a strong competition and there are some very strong teams playing in it. The standard is pretty much the same down here as it was up there around Ballarat.

“I’m expecting (the Warrnambool and District Football Netball League) to have its good teams. It’s pretty similar for the most part.”

Currie said Allansford’s troupe of new players meant she hadn’t felt isolated in her transition to the club.

“It’s so good out there. Everybody is so nice, ridiculously nice,” she said.

“It makes it easier when you are fitting in, not being the only person thinking they don’t know anybody. 

“You tend to gravitate towards those who are new and it makes the whole process more comfortable.

“I just want to improve my netball the best I can and to see what I can offer for the club.”

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