This week in history across the south-west

25 YEARS AGO

Grim figures showed family violence in the south-west was costing about $2 million each year with 167 cases reported the previous year. 

The camera remembers: The journey may have been slow but for Adam Thompson driving the bullocks but there was plenty of time to take in the views of the Boggy Creek area. Picture: L. Williams

The camera remembers: The journey may have been slow but for Adam Thompson driving the bullocks but there was plenty of time to take in the views of the Boggy Creek area. Picture: L. Williams

The prospect of year-round trading in Warrnambool was revived. 

Members of the Corangamite Soaring Club made history by completing the first Trans-Australian Glider flight.

The National Farmers Federation were appealing to the government to declare severe drought as a natural disaster.  

Three Warrnambool hotels were considering a strike as they challenged the Liquor Licensing Commission’s decision to prevent extending their trading hours.

50 YEARS AGO

District police were still searching for a prisoner who escaped Cooriemungle Prison Farm. 

Councillors were divided about the potential for a joint library service between the town and the shire. 

A giant oil rig arrived in Portland after travelling more than three months.

Camperdown’s 120ft clock was opened to the public, as was Macarthur’s swimming pool. 

75 YEARS AGO

Illegal duck shooting was becoming common in the south-west and a warning was issued that action would be taken if caught. 

100 YEARS AGO

Penshurst annual show profits were donated to patriotic funds. 

The number of policemen in Warrnambool was reduced to two after it was announced the South Warrnambool Police Station was to be closed. 

A ten-year-old boy drowned after swimming between the viaduct and islands at the mouth of the Merri River. 

The Lands Minister said he would make a special effort to cut the number of fire outbreaks during summer. 

125 YEARS AGO

A diving team brought a whaling boat from Melbourne to salvage cargo from the wreck of the ship Fiji. 

Son of the famous author Charles Dickens, Mr A. Tennyson Dickens was to lecture at Warrnambool. 

A Scottish butter merchant visiting the south-west said Victorian butter had a future overseas. 

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