NBA coach says World Cup will be invaluable experience for Gleeson

Philadelphia 76ers head coach Brett Brown demonstrates a defensive technique as he hits the court during a coaching seminar in Warrnambool.     140810AM18 
Picture: ANGELA MILNE

Philadelphia 76ers head coach Brett Brown demonstrates a defensive technique as he hits the court during a coaching seminar in Warrnambool. 140810AM18 Picture: ANGELA MILNE

FORMER Australian Boomers coach Brett Brown says Warrnambool export Trevor Gleeson’s coaching nous will improve markedly after his first taste on the world stage later this month.

The Philadelphia 76ers head coach believes Gleeson’s role as Boomers assistant coach at the FIBA World Cup in Spain will provide the Perth Wildcats’ championship-winning coach with invaluable experience.

Brown, who led Australia to the 2012 London Olympic Games, saw Gleeson at the NBA summer league in Las Vegas in July.

“You just immerse yourself in video tape because you’re trying to scout the next opponent and you see things in a more detailed way and given Trevor’s background being a head coach, I think he is going to take this experience and really help Australian basketball number one and help himself and the Perth Wildcats number two,” Brown said. 

“I think it’s going to be great.”

Brown, preparing for his second year as an NBA head coach, is holidaying in Port Fairy with his family and ran a coaches’ seminar at Warrnambool Basketball Stadium yesterday alongside Melbourne United mentor Chris Anstey.

“I don’t remember a more healthy stage of Australian basketball in relation to the NBA and how it’s received around the world.” - Philadelphia 76ers head coach Brett Brown

He said Gleeson would relish the opportunity to coach a star-studded Australian squad at a high-quality tournament.

“I had the great experience and privilege to go to three Olympic Games, two world championships and I remember my first time was in Atlanta,” Brown said.

“You just cannot believe what you learn. You see different styles, you see different tactics.

“The NBA is different than the NCAA, which is different to FIBA, which is different to NBL.

“It’s the same game but you can learn from so many coaches and so many leagues all around the world.”

Brown said the rise of Australian basketball’s profile in the NBA — Patty Mills and Aron Baynes played in San Antonio Spurs’ championship win and Dante Exum was selected at pick five in June’s draft — was exciting. 

“I think over the years the Australian reputation of how we play basketball has grown and grown,” he said.

“It is a respected style of play from a physical standpoint. It’s an admired style of play from a chemistry standpoint, from a mateship standpoint.

“I don’t remember a more healthy stage of Australian basketball in relation to the NBA and how it’s received around the world.”

Brown said it was hard to delve too deeply into the state of the NBL given his focus was on his own coaching duties in the US.

But the 1994 NBL coach of the year, who led North Melbourne Magic to the championship that season, said the Australian competition was well respected.

Brown, a former San Antonio Spurs assistant coach, took Philadelphia through the first stage of a rebuilding process last season. 

The 76ers finished their 2013-14 campaign with 16 wins and 63 losses but Brown has his eyes focused on sustained long-term success.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop