Double hit for Sackville Street traders

Traffic in Sackville Street has been reduced to one way this week and about three-quarters of the street’s parking spaces eliminated.

Traffic in Sackville Street has been reduced to one way this week and about three-quarters of the street’s parking spaces eliminated.

PORT Fairy traders are annoyed at repeated disruptions to traffic in the town’s main street.

Traffic in Sackville Street has been reduced to one way this week and about three-quarters of the street’s parking spaces eliminated.

The restrictions have been imposed to allow Wannon Water to replace ageing water mains in the street. Port Fairy Business Association president Ken Brookes said traders were annoyed the work was not done when traffic was disrupted about three weeks ago for a week when Wannon Water did other work on the street’s water supply infrastructure.

This week’s restrictions have shut down the western side of Sackville Street and come on top of the closure of part of the street’s eastern side for the installation of bluestone footpaths.

Mr Brookes said traders had received plenty of notice from Moyne Shire Council about the impact of the bluestone paving work but little warning of the work by Wannon Water.

“They (Wannon Water) should have put down the PVC pipes about three weeks ago when they had the road closed for a week then,” Mr Brookes said. “It is making things difficult for traders.”

A caller to The Standard said the traffic disruption and loss of parking made it difficult for the elderly, who had to walk lengthy distances to get to the Sackville Street shops. 

Wannon Water managing director Grant Green said it had discovered the Sackville Street water pipes between Cox and Bank streets were in poor condition after it took the opportunity to inspect them while Moyne Shire Council was replacing the street’s pavement and road surfaces.

Mr Green said the replacement of the pipes was a proactive measure.

He said the works would be undertaken until next Monday.

Port Fairy IGA supermarket owner Colin Cleary said he hoped the short-term pain would be offset by having a more secure water supply.

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