How midwives are changing the world

MOTHER’S Day is tomorrow, but earlier this week a group of people a lot of mothers are thankful for were recognised.

New mum Melissa Ford, of Portland, and South West Healthcare midwife Michelle Osbourne with the product of their shared labours, baby Nelly Mae.

New mum Melissa Ford, of Portland, and South West Healthcare midwife Michelle Osbourne with the product of their shared labours, baby Nelly Mae.

Monday was International Day of the Midwife — a worldwide opportunity to thank those who help mums bring the next generation into the world.

While there were a few extra scones in the tea room on Monday, it was business as usual at Warrnambool Base Hospital’s midwifery unit, one of the sections that benefited from upgrades.

“It’s a lot more enjoyable environment to work in,” midwifery unit manager Peter Logan said.

“It’s more patient-centred compared to what we had.”

International Day of the Midwife aims to recognise and raise awareness about the work of midwives, including the 60 or so at the Warrnambool Base Hospital who help deliver an average of 750 babies each year.

“Midwives are helping mothers have healthy babies and caring for mothers and babies,” Mr Logan said.

“They’re an important part in the whole pregnancy and birth process … and those are things people remember for the rest of their lives.”

International Day of the Midwife theme was “Midwives: changing the world one family at a time”.

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