GMH boss says Australians still want Holdens

Motoring on: Callaghan Motors dealer principal Steve Callaghan (left) with GMH managing director Gerry Dorizas before last night s presentation dinner for the dealership s Grand Masters award. Picture: LEANNE PICKETT

Motoring on: Callaghan Motors dealer principal Steve Callaghan (left) with GMH managing director Gerry Dorizas before last night s presentation dinner for the dealership s Grand Masters award. Picture: LEANNE PICKETT

HOLDEN will continue to sell strongly in the south-west despite the demise of its domestic manufacturing base, the company's managing director claims.

New General Motors Holden (GMH) chief Gerry Dorizas visited Warrnambool last night to recognise Callaghan Motors' success in the company's Grand Masters awards.

While the brand has long prided itself in producing distinctively Australian vehicles, Mr Dorizas said the Holden name was still well regarded by motoring enthusiasts and ordinary drivers alike.

Former managing director Mike Devereux announced last year it would cease making vehicles in Australia by 2017, ending a 60-year legacy of domestic production.

Mr Dorizas succeeded Mr Devereux in the top GMH job two months ago.

"The end of production is not just an Australian phenomenon there's been a shift in a number of countries in the way they handle manufacturing," Mr Dorizas said.

"Sales are actually up this year (compared to last) and the Commodore is really selling well. Nobody knows Australian cars like Holden does and the brand is still very strong."

Mr Dorizas commended Callaghan Motors for its performance during the past decade, with dealer principal Steve Callaghan accepting the company's latest Grand Masters award at a function last night.

Callaghans was one of only 32 dealerships to receive the award out of 235 Holden outlets nationwide.

alex.sinnott@fairfaxmedia.com.au

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