Father Maguire to speak at Port Fairy documentary screening

THE heartfelt and acclaimed Aussie documentary In Bob We Trust will be screened in Port Fairy tomorrow, with its subject on hand to talk about the film and his amazing life.

Father Bob Maguire will be in the region tomorrow talking about his life and helping to raise funds for St Brigid’s in Crossley.

Father Bob Maguire will be in the region tomorrow talking about his life and helping to raise funds for St Brigid’s in Crossley.

The Bob in question is Father Bob Maguire, perhaps the most beloved and well- known priest in Australia.

Father Maguire will be stopping by at St Brigid’s church and hall at Crossley for a BYO community lunch from 12.30pm tomorrow, with everyone welcome to attend for the price of a donation to the Friends of St Brigid’s.

He will then attend Port Fairy’s Reardon Theatre for a screening of In Bob We Trust and a Q&A session from 7pm.

There will also be a matinee screening of In Bob We Trust at 2.30pm at the Reardon, but Father Maguire won’t be in attendance for that showing.

Both screenings will also help raise funds for the upkeep of the community-owned church and hall at Crossley.

For almost four decades, Father Maguire took a hands-on approach to helping the poor, the homeless and the underprivileged in his parish of South Melbourne. 

But his outspoken views and warm generosity — which often followed the credo “what would Jesus do?” as opposed to “what is the church hierarchy telling me to do?” — brought him into conflict with his superiors, who attempted to force retirement upon Father Maguire.

The documentary follows those battles as his parishioners fought to keep their popular priest.

Father Maguire is known to many through his media appearances, which include a regular Sunday night show on national youth broadcaster Triple J alongside documentarian John Safran.

In Bob We Trust was released to strong reviews last year, with ABC’s Margaret Pomeranz calling it “very entertaining and ultimately quite sad”, while the Sydney Morning Herald’s Paul Byrnes called it “a remarkably feisty, moving and innovative documentary”.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop