Aboriginal rangers train in fire control

SOUTH-WEST Aboriginal rangers are brushing up on their  skills to help control fires on their traditional lands this summer.

Several attended a recent training camp at Anglesea conducted by the Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) where their skills were tested during last week’s hot weather with planned burns and a range of other prevention and preparation exercises.

They were among recruit project firefighters added to the list of more than 70 across the Barwon South West region.

“The camp brought together new recruits and seasoned firefighters from DEPI, Parks Victoria and Country Fire Authority who had a range of perspectives and real-life experiences,” DEPI land and fire regional manager Andrew Morrow said. “Recruits gained an understanding of what it’s really like out there on the fire line, whether in the desert or dense forest.

“The Budj Bim Co-operative Management Council requested the opportunity again after last year’s successful training.

“This takes the total of their trained Aboriginal rangers to 11.

“DEPI will continue to work with them to build their capability to manage fire on their land.”

Under the native title settlement Gunditjmara people were given active involvement in decisions and management of their agreement area which includes Mount Eccles and associated reserves.

pcollins@fairfaxmedia.com.au

Several attended a recent training camp at Anglesea conducted by the Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) where their skills were tested during last week’s hot weather with planned burns and a range of other prevention and preparation exercises.

They were among recruit project firefighters added to the list of more than 70 across the Barwon South West region.

“The camp brought together new recruits and seasoned firefighters from DEPI, Parks Victoria and Country Fire Authority who had a range of perspectives and real-life experiences,” DEPI land and fire regional manager Andrew Morrow said. “Recruits gained an understanding of what it’s really like out there on the fire line, whether in the desert or dense forest.

“The Budj Bim Co-operative Management Council requested the opportunity again after last year’s successful training.

“This takes the total of their trained Aboriginal rangers to 11.

“DEPI will continue to work with them to build their capability to manage fire on their land.”

Under the native title settlement Gunditjmara people were given active involvement in decisions and management of their agreement area which includes Mount Eccles and associated reserves.

pcollins@fairfaxmedia.com.au

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