Wind turbine infrasound not a problem: report

HUNDREDS of wind turbines across the south-west are not to blame for health problems, according to the latest health review by the state government.

Inaudible noise known as infrasound has long been the target of activists who claim it causes health problems such as dizziness and nausea. 

But a review released by the Department of Health has bluntly knocked back their claims, saying sitting inside a car creates more of the low frequency noise than the swoosh of the turbines. 

“There is no evidence that sound which is at inaudible levels can have a physiological effect on the human body,” the report says.

“Physiological effects on humans have only been detected at levels that are easily audible.” 

The review — which relies on both domestic and international scientific studies — pinpoints individual responses to noise levels and psychological reasons for being behind the health problems commonly referred to as “wind turbine syndrome”. 

The south-west is home to some of Australia’s most organised anti-wind farm campaigners in Penshurst, Macarthur and Waubra near Ballarat which is in the federal seat of Wannon. 

Last month a number of them picketed the opening of the Macarthur wind farm, claiming the 140 turbines have led to insomnia and headaches. 

Demonstrators also met with South West Coast MP and Premier Denis Napthine at his Liebig Street office, but didn’t get any support for their claims. 

Speaking to The Standard yesterday, prominent anti-wind campaigner Annie Gardner challenged the state government to conduct independent infrasound testing at properties around Macarthur. 

She said an independent acoustician had been commissioned by locals to record infrasound levels in the area. 

“They haven’t done any independent infrasound testing in Victoria,” Ms Gardner said. “You can’t compare it to being in a car — you aren’t in a car for 365 days a year.”  

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